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AWG E-MAIL NEWS 2006-21
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CONTENTS
1)
2)    PLAN ACTIVITIES NOW FOR EARTH SCIENCE WEEK 2006    
3)    GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA CONFERENCE TO ADDRESS MANAGING DROUGHT AND WATER SCARCITY            
4)    NSF ANNOUNCES NEW FUNDING OPPRTUNITY    
5)    AGU FALL MEETING: SPECIAL SESSION ON EARTH SCIENCE TEACHING
6)    CONTACT INFORMATION

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Thanks to everyone who contributed to this issue of E-mail News
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1)  CNSF CONGRESSIONAL VISITS

The Coalition for National Science Funding (CNSF), which includes AGI and many of our Member Societies, will organize congressional visits for groups of scientists and engineers to voice a shared message of greater support for research and education.  There will be an orientation and reception on Tuesday, September 12 and the visits will be scheduled on Wednesday, September 13.  This is an excellent opportunity to speak with Members of Congress about the value and importance of science and engineering as well as a chance to meet other scientists, engineers, policy makers and federal agency officials.

Please contact Government Affairs at govt@agiweb.org or Linda Rowan at rowan@agiweb.org as soon as possible if you would be interested in participating.  We need more citizen scientists and citizen engineers!

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2)    PLAN ACTIVITIES NOW FOR EARTH SCIENCE WEEK 2006

Earth Science Week is only two months away.  You can organize your own local activity or become involved in one of the many activities already being planned for the week of October 8-14.  How will you celebrate Earth Science Week 2006?

You can promote this year's theme - Be a Citizen Scientist - by engaging others in conducting real citizen-science research and helping to spread science literacy.  Record observations of cloud patterns.  Dig up fossil evidence of past life.  Gather rocks in your neighborhood, crack them open with a rock hammer, and examine their insides with a magnifying glass.  Take field trips to museums, science centers, parks, university geoscience departments, and weather stations.  Volunteer to collect data on water and air quality, biodiversity, climate change, and other phenomena for environmental monitoring efforts.  Conduct activities featured in the Earth Science Week Toolkit and Web site.

Last year, Earth Science Week was celebrated in all 50 states as well as other countries. Arizona's Petrified Forest National Park held a special event including special tours and displays, a geological scavenger hunt, and hands-on exhibits.  Ohio's St. Paris Public Library teamed with the nearby Graham High School Science Department, inviting first- through third-graders to participate in Earth science experiments and hear a talk by a Wright State University paleontologist.

Looking for adventure?  Be one of the thousands of people nationwide who are expected to go online, look up predetermined latitude and longitude coordinates, and use a Global Positioning System to hunt down a nearby location on the first day of Earth Science Week.  This EarthCache EventCache is being organized by the Geological Society of America (GSA), a major event partner.  Participants in these "geocaching" activities will visit geological outcrops, fossil and mineral collecting sites, college geoscience departments, and state geological surveys.  There, Earth scientists and other experts will provide educational talks about their site.  To set up an EarthCache or learn more about how you can participate, visit http://www.Geocaching.com or contact GSA at cmclelland@geosociety.org

For more ideas on how you can participate, read about successful past events at http://www.earthsciweek.org/highlights/index, or see recommendations for planning, fundraising, and advertising your event at http://www.earthsciweek.org/forplanners/index

Earth Science Week Toolkit available now

The new Earth Science Week Toolkit is arriving on doorsteps across the country this month.  The Toolkit is packed with everything you need to join the celebration, lead Earth science educational activities, and promote science literacy.

The 2006 Toolkit includes a school-year calendar running from August 2006 through July 2007 that features classroom activities, important geoscience information, and dates of relevant current events and Earth science milestones for each month.  The Toolkit also features an overview of citizen-science and geoscience resources available from USGS, a NASA brochure detailing geoscience education programs and products, a National Parks DVD, a 24-page NOAA booklet on climate, a Scholastic/AGI poster for elementary-level Earth science teachers, and more.

In addition, the careers-oriented 2005 Toolkit ("Geoscientists Explore the Earth") and the natural hazards-focused 2004 Toolkit ("Living on a Restless Earth") is still available for order.

Library Rate shipping and handling in the U.S. is included.  Expect delivery 2-3 weeks after payment is received.  Faster shipping services are available at additional cost (phone 703-379-2480 for details).  Orders outside of the United States will incur additional shipping charges.  For special shipping, bulk orders, and more information, visit http://www.earthsciweek.org/materials/index.html

Join winners of last year's Earth Science Week contests

Earth Science Week organizers hope that this year's contest submissions will top last year's record number of entries.  More than 500 people nationwide entered the Earth Science Week 2005 art, essay, and photography contests.

Last year's first-place winners were:
James Pugh, of Elgin, South Carolina, for his poster, "Volcanologists: It's a Hot Job."
Robert Kendall, of Phoenix, Arizona, for his essay, "The Big Dream," in which Kendall describes his love for paleontology and the career he hopes to pursue.
Brandy Anglen, of Fresno, California, for her photo of scientists testing water for sulfur isotopes at Lake Hoare in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica.

This year, the photography contest, open to all ages, focuses on "Using and Studying Earth's Resources."  Participants are encouraged to think creatively and submit pictures of geoscientists studying or working with the Earth's natural resources or people using these resources.

The 2006 visual arts contest is titled "Earth Science in Your Home Town."  Students in grades K-5 are encouraged to draw, paint, or create a poster on any aspect of Earth science that affects their local community.  Artwork entries should be no larger than 24-by-36 inches.

Also this year, students in grades 5-9 are eligible to enter the essay contest: "Be a Citizen Scientist!"  Essays must be no longer than 500 words and should highlight the ways every person can contribute to a better understanding of our planet.

The photography, visual arts, and essay contests offer opportunities for both students and the general public to participate in the celebration, learn about the Earth sciences, and compete for prizes.  The first-place prize for each contest is $300.  To learn more about these contests, or to view last year's winning entries, visit http://www.earthsciweek.org/contests
    
    
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3)    GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA CONFERENCE TO ADDRESS MANAGING DROUGHT AND WATER SCARCITY

Geoscientists from around the globe will gather next month to address "Managing Drought and Water Scarcity in Vulnerable Environments: Creating a Roadmap for Change in the United States."  The conference, convened by the Geological Society of America, takes place 18-20 September at the Radisson Hotel and Conference Center, Longmont, Colorado, USA.

"In the U.S., drought has been viewed largely as a natural hazard, eliciting a reactive response that may be characterized as a 'hydro-illogical' model," said Donald A. Wilhite, Director, National Drought Mitigation Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and technical program chair of the conference.  "What we're looking to accomplish is a shift from crisis management to risk management."

According to Wilhite, a driving force behind the meeting is the need to ensure adequate water resources for future generations when drought periods and their impacts are expected to increase.  Drought is a nationwide issue, as reflected by conference registration which spans states from California to Florida and Arizona to New Jersey.

Wilhite notes that other countries have developed forward-looking drought policies and practices. International research and experience will be shared by attendees from Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, India, and Iran.

Conference outcomes will include recommendations for changes in policy and practice.  A document will be developed after the meeting for use in supporting congressional visits, letter-writing campaigns, and other efforts to accomplish policy change.

Scientific Program

The program consists of invited talks, volunteered posters, field trips, and discussion sessions. Topics include:

  * Paleo-record of drought in the U.S. and implications for the future
  * Decadal-scale drought and changing vulnerabilities
  * New technologies for drought prediction and monitoring
  * Impacts of climate change
  * Drought and water quality
  * Drought risk management
  * Water storage issues
  * Planning for drought and climate change

View the program at http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2006DRO/finalprogram/.

Participating Organizations

American Meteorological Society
American Water Resources Association
American Water Works Association
Colorado State University
Desert Research Institute
Ecological Society of America
Groundwater Foundation
National Center for Atmospheric Research
National Drought Mitigation Center
National Ground Water Association
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Water Research Institute
National Institutes for Water Resources
Natural Hazards Center
Society for Range Management
Soil Science Society of America
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
U.S. Geological Survey
Western Rural Development Center
Western Water Assessment

Additional Information and Registration

For additional information on the conference see http://www.geosociety.org/meetings/06drought/index.htm.

Online registration may be accessed via http://www.geosociety.org/meetings/06drought/registration.htm.

Questions may be directed to Deborah Nelson, GSA Director of Strategic Initiatives, 303-357-1014 or dnelson@geosociety.org.

Geological Society of America
3300 Penrose Place – Box 9140
Boulder, CO 80301-9140 USA
www.geosociety.org

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4)    NSF ANNOUNCES NEW FUNDING OPPRTUNITY    

NSF has announced a new funding opportunity.  The solicitation calls for proposals to develop Critical Zone Observatories that will operate at the watershed scale and that will significantly advance our understanding of the integration and coupling of Earth surface processes as mediated by the presence and flux of fresh water.  

For more information, visit the NSF web site:
http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=500044&org=NSF&from=home

Letter of Intent Deadline Date:  October 2, 2006
Full Proposal Deadline Date:  December 15, 2006

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5)    AGU FALL MEETING: SPECIAL SESSION ON EARTH SCIENCE TEACHING

You are invited to participate in a special session on innovative earth science teaching at the 2006 American Geological Union (AGU) Fall Meeting to be held in San Francisco, CA, from December 11-15, 2006.

Education and Human Resources: ED04  
Session: Hands-on, Inquiry-based Classroom and Lab Assignments: Bringing Geoscience Research on Earth Surface Processes and Hydrology to K-12 and Undergraduate Students
Conveners: Kate Pound and Karen Campbell
URL: http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm06/?content=search&show=detail&sessid=164

A unique characteristic of this session is the afternoon “Hands-on Gallery” in which presenters informally demonstrate their activities to all meeting attendees, including participants in a parallel teacher workshop.  In addition we encourage presenters to submit session materials to the National Association of Geoscience Teachers’ website (http://www.nagt.org/nagt/programs/activities_collection.html) for wider dissemination.  Our similar session and workshop at 2005 Fall AGU was very well-attended; enjoyable and stimulating for all.  

Abstracts are due on September 7th, and can be submitted at http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm06/.   Please note this year’s focus on teaching surface processes and hydrology.

Please contact conveners Kate Pound (kspound@stcloudstate.edu) or Karen Campbell (kmc@umn.edu) or visit http://www.nced.umn.edu/handson.html for additional information.  Your submissions are encouraged!
    
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6)    CONTACT INFORMATION

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